FAQs about the ASRT Program

ASRT Logo for Regeneron and ZEISS_edited.jpg

Who should consider applying for the ASRT Program?

Any high school teacher who fits into one of these categories:

  • Currently runs an established Science Research Program (course/elective) as a dedicated course during the school day and has students regularly enter regional science fairs.

  • Currently runs an established Science Research Club or after-school program and has students regularly enter regional science fairs.

  • Currently has students carry out research projects as a part of a core class (Earth Science, Biology, Chemistry, Physics, etc..), and has them regularly enter regional science fairs.  As well as, having a strong interest in, and support for, creating a structured, Science Research Program (elective).
     

Any science fair director who is willing to:

  • apply on behalf of a larger group of high school teachers (up to 15), that are involved in their local or regional science fairs.

  • assume responsibility for organizing the group of participating high school teachers and provide a location for the ASRT workshop in their region.

Do teachers have to have a pre-existing, established Science Research Program to apply and/or be considered?

Whether a high school teacher runs an established Science Research Program/Club or incorporates science research project opportunities into their science curriculum, they are eligible to apply for one of the ASRT sessions.

High school teachers may apply individually or as a group. 

In some cases, science fair directors have applied on behalf of a larger group of high school teachers (up to 15), that are involved in their local or regional science fairs. In those cases, the science fair director would be responsible for organizing the group and providing a location for the ASRT workshop in their region, should they be selected.

Applicants will be evaluated by a committee from Regeneron and/or ZEISS, on the basis of their interest in building and/or growing such a program/opportunities, readiness and capacity in terms of finances and faculty, as well as their administration’s level of support for providing science research opportunities for their high school students.

Can teachers apply together?

Yes. High school teachers can apply individually or as a small group. As the ASRT Program is very customized for each teacher/school, it is preferable to keep a group relatively small though a larger group with similar interests is fine. 

If a group is applying, one teacher should take the lead role and fill out the application. However, there will be a part of the application where the lead teacher can explain more about the group.

Science fair directors can also apply on behalf of the high school teachers involved in their science fair as long as the criteria listed in the previous question are met.

Will the ASRT sessions be in-person or virtual for 2022 ?

Just as all of the ASRT sessions in 2021 were in-person, the 2022 ASRT sessions will be as well unless circumstances related to COVID restrictions change.

How many teachers/schools will be selected to receive the free week-long ASRT Program?

Thanks to funding from Regeneron and ZEISS,  8-10  science fair directors or high school teachers that coordinate science research projects and/or run the Science Research Program/Club will be selected as “Finalists”.


Each "finalist" will receive one-week of in-person, consulting sessions customized to help them overcome obstacles and reach their goals. 
 

In addition, a few high school teachers that coordinate science research projects and/or run the Science Research Program/Club will be selected as “Semi-Finalists”. Each will receive 2 days of virtual consulting sessions customized to help them overcome obstacles and reach their goals.

Is there any cost for the teacher or school district for the ASRT program?

No. Thanks to funding from Regeneron and ZEISS, there is no cost at all for the teacher or school. The entire week of the ASRT program is free of charge.

What is the typical schedule of the week-long ASRT Program?

For all selected “Finalists”, each workshop would run at or near the high school/school district for four and a half days in the summer.

The dates for the workshop would be based on the preferences of the teacher applying. Options are listed in the application. There are options for dates within the following:

  • mid January - mid February

  • early April - late April

  • early June - late August

  • mid September - mid October

During the summer months the typical schedule is:

  • Monday through Thursday from 9:00am-3:00pm

  • Friday from 9:00am-12:00pm

  • Additional follow-up sessions online in the months following the workshop. 

 

During the school year the schedule can match what is listed above or it could be altered to reduce the impact of missing multiple school days. One option could be:

  • Wednesday from 4:00pm - 8:00pm

  • Thursday, Friday and Saturday from 9:00am-3:00pm

  • Additional follow-up sessions online in the months following the workshop. 

 

For all selected “Semi-Finalists”, the virtual workshop days would be discussed between the ASRT Program Director and each recipient.

What is new for the 2022 ASRT Program?

  • Previously, only individual teachers or small groups could apply, however for 2022, science fair directors are welcome to apply on behalf of a group of regional high school teachers involved in their science fair

  • Previously, only the summer months were available, however for 2022, options are available January, February, April, June, July, August, September and October

  • Previously, ASRT was only offered during the summer and the only model was a 4.5 day, in-person workshop (Monday-Friday). However, for 2022, ASRT is now being offered during the school year as well, so there is an additional option to run the in-person workshop for 3.5 days (Wednesday afternoon, Thursday, Friday & Saturday) with additional follow-up sessions online during the subsequent months. Alternative options may also be available.

How are the "Finalists" determined?

Applicants will be evaluated by a committee from Regeneron and/or ZEISS, on the basis of a number of different criteria including, but not limited to:

  • Their interest in increasing the number of activities that build understanding & critical thinking, technology-based skills, networking skills, presentation skills and lifelong skills

  • Their interest in increasing the number of high school students who carry out projects and participate in regional, state, national and international science fairs

  • Their interest in increasing the quality/level of the projects that their high school students are involved in

  • Their interest in increasing the types/categories of the projects that their high school students are involved in

  • Their level of support from the school community and their administration for creating science research/STEM opportunities for high school students

Are the ASRT Program activities designed exclusively for teachers that have a pre-existing, established Science Research Program?

Each of the sessions and activities can be adapted to suit any style of Science Research Program, Elective, Club or modified to be included within the constraints of a standard science class. However, it is important that teachers have expressed an interest in growing and strengthening their program and/or science research opportunities for students as well as increasing the number of students that participate in regional and national science fairs/competitions.

Is there continued support for the ASRT Program recipients during the school year?

Support is available for all ASRT Program teachers via phone, Zoom and email throughout the school year.

Who runs the ASRT Program?

The program is facilitated by 35-year high school science teacher veteran, founder of the award-winning Science Research Program at Yorktown High School in NY and director/co-founder of the Regeneron-Westchester Science and Engineering Fair (WESEF), Michael Blueglass.

More information can be found in the "Program Director" section of this website

How is the ASRT Program customized for each teacher/group of teachers?

The high school student research activities that are covered in the ASRT workshop is customized to suit nearly any form of Science Research Program/Club or science research activities within a science curriculum.

Previous to the ASRT workshops, we review the current status and short-term and long-term goals with each teacher including the following questions:

  • During a TYPICAL YEAR which of the following describes you the best.

    • I currently run an established Science Research Program (course/elective) as a dedicated course during the school day and has students regularly enter regional science fairs.

    • I am in charge of an established Science Research Club or after-school program and I have students regularly enter regional science fairs.

    • I have my students carry out research projects as a part of a core class (Earth Science, Biology, Chemistry, Physics, etc..), and I have them regularly enter regional science fairs.  I also have a strong interest in, and support for, creating a structured, Science Research Program (elective).

  • What is the level of support for the science research projects/program from the faculty/guidance/administration/parent community? 

  • What are your overall goals regarding the science research projects/program (for the upcoming school year and in the near future)?

  • What have been the obstacles towards accomplishing those goals?

  • How many students are typically involved in carrying out science research projects and what is the grade level breakdown (how many 9th, 10th, 11th and 12th graders)?

  • Which science fairs/competitions are mandatory? optional? for which grade levels?
     

With this information, and further pre-workshop conversations, the ASRT Program can be customized to help each teacher address their specific goals and overcome any obstacles.

What are some of the most common topics that are covered during the ASRT Program?

Please note that the following are just sample topics. Additional topics and the amount of time spent on each are customized according to the type of in-class, science research project activities or Science Research Program/Club at each school. See the next question for a broader list of possible topics to cover during the ASRT workshop.

  • How to help students select a project topic that is both interesting and meaningful for them yet achievable given a variety of constraints (possibility of finding a mentor, time needed to carry out a related project, expenses involved in and distance needed to travel to do the research, etc..).

  • How to improve the “pool” of scientific mentors that can help to guide students through their project, in person or virtually.

  • How to “Think outside of the box” for project and mentor possibilities.

  • Planning a yearly timeline for all of the different grades involved in the program.

  • Creating activities that will help students find and understand basic information on their research topic of interest such as from instructional videos, general articles, topic related guides.

  • Creating activities that will help students find and understand advanced information on their research topic of interest such as from professional, “Journal” articles.

  • Creating activities that will help students with learning basic research skills in their chosen area of research.

  • Creating strategies for running a multi-curricular, multi-age, multi-stage classroom, where each student may be carrying out a project on a different topic.

  • Strategies for creating professional level, hopefully award winning, poster and PowerPoint/Google Slides presentations for Science Research competitions.

  • Strategies for writing award winning, science research papers to enter into local and national competitions and increasing chances of success in science research competitions.

  • Reviewing all rules, regulations and deadlines regarding the different science fairs and competitions.

  • How to increase support for the science research projects or Science Research Program/Club with the parents and/or community through outreach activities.

  • How to increase publicity for the science research opportunities or Science Research Program in the early stages and whenever a student is recognized with an award.

  • Review of the classroom set up and the equipment available/needed.

  • How to increase the number of students involved in carrying out science research projects or joining a Science Research Program/Club.

  • How to blend the goals of your science research projects or Science Research Program/Club with the guidelines of the A.P. Capstone Program or I.B. Program.

  • Potential options for offering college credit for the students involved in an established Science Research Program.

What are potential topics that can be covered during the ASRT Program?

  1. Building a Science Research Program/Elective/Club

    • Increasing the quantity and quality of incoming students

    • Building parent support

    • Building school district support

    • Making the program a "thing"

    • Spirit building merchandise

    • Spirit building social media ideas
       

  2. 1st year (Introductory) Science Research student activities

    • Class structure and rules

    • Goals and grading

    • Online searching skills

    • Finding general and advanced (journal) articles related to the chosen area of research

    • PowerPoint/Google Slides basic skills

    • Selecting research topics

    • Understanding and explaining Basic info. in the chosen area of research

    • Deciphering, understanding and explaining advanced info. in the chosen area of research

    • Designing a small project and writing up a research plan

    • Identifying and memorizing key vocabulary terms in the chosen area of research

    • Presenting general research topic via PowerPoint/Google Slides

    • Creating a general research topic via poster

    • Presenting an advanced, journal article in the chosen area of research

    • Anticipating general and challenging questions in the chosen area of research

    • Creating a poster to showcase the upcoming, intended research project

    • Practicing the poster presentation to peers, teachers, parent and community members

    • Presenting the upcoming, intended research project at a local competition

    • Presenting at the end-of-year symposium/showcase via poster

    • Planning for a long-term, summer-based research project
       

  3. 2nd year (Intermediate) Science Research student activities

    • Class structure and rules

    • Goals and grading

    • Analyzing winning vs non-winning student research papers

    • Writing the first section of the research paper including; introduction, review of literature, problem statements, objectives and hypotheses

    • Creating the first section of the research poster

    • Writing the second section of the research paper including methodology

    • Creating the second section of the research poster

    • Writing the third section of the research paper including; results, analysis, discussion, application, conclusion and future research

    • Creating the third section of the research poster

    • Practicing the poster presentation to peers, teachers, parent and community members

    • Presenting phase 1 of the research project in local competitions

    • Planning for phase 2 of a long-term, summer-based research project or designing phase 1 of a new project

    • Starting the personal essays and application for the senior year competition – the Regeneron Science Talent Search

    • Presenting at the end-of-year symposium/showcase via poster
       

  4. 3rd year (Advanced) Science Research student activities

    • Writing the full paper to enter into all competitions including; Regeneron Science Talent Search (STS), Junior Science and Humanities Symposium (JSHS), Regional Science Fair affiliated with the Regeneron International Science and Engineering Fair (ISEF) and the International Genius Olympiad

    • Creating a PowerPoint/Google Slides presentation to present in the JSHS competition

    • Creating a poster to present in the regional ISEF-affiliated science fair and the International Genius Olympiad

    • Creating a brochure to share the research project with a broader audience

    • Presenting at the end-of-year symposium/showcase via PowerPoint/Google Slides
       

  5. Competitions/Science Fairs

    • Understanding the different competitions/science fair opportunities

    • Formats, deadlines and limitations/restrictions
       

  6. Mentors

    • How to help students find a mentor to help guide them with their research?

    • How to reach out as a teacher? As a student?
       

  7. Community outreach

    • Public presentations/practice sessions at the school

    • Public presentations in the community
       

  8. Behavioral (Large Scale/Nationwide Survey) Projects

    • Creating a school-based Institutional Review Board (IRB)

    • Deciding on a topic

    • Creating a survey

    • Reaching out to potential mentors and organizations

    • Coding results to be statistically analyzed

    • Analyzing what the results show
       

  9. Statistical analysis and graphing resources

    • Benefits and drawbacks of different statistical analysis/graphing programs (apps)

    • Choosing the correct graph type to represent the data appropriately and clearly
       

  10. Poster presentations

    • Technology tips to help with poster design

    • Poster review and critique

    • Poster printing and display supplies and ideas

    • Presentation timing and tips
       

  11. PowerPoint/Google Slide presentations

    • PowerPoint/Google Slides design and tech. tips

    • PowerPoint/Google Slides review and critique

    • Presentation timing and tips
       

  12. Paper writing

    • Paper design and structure based on different competitions

    • Paper review and critique
       

  13. Building and growing a science fair

    • Organizing the numerous components

    • Awards and Sponsors

    • Facility/Staff/Volunteer requirements